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JAMESTOWN, Va. — The racial tension at the roots of the American experiment bubbled over Tuesday at the place where it all started, as the mere presence of President Trump turned festivities marking 400 years of representative democracy at Jamestown into a theater of protest.

Trump himself was well-behaved, sticking largely to a recitation of history and praise for the British settlers who formed a government in Jamestown on July 30, 1619. It was “the greatest accomplishment in the history of the world, and I congratulate you — it started right here,” he said.

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Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring made waves this past Sunday when he wrote a column in the Daily newspaper saying he supported the decriminalization and eventual legalization of marijuana.

Delegate Sickles recognized and memoralized Wesley Charles Lipicky, a nine year old boy killed in a tragic school accident on year ago in May 2018. Here are a series of news clips about Wesley Lipicky and the ceremonial bill signing of HB 1753 that took place on May 13, 2019. A press release with more information about the ceremonial signing can be found here

 

The lineups are finally set for the budget playoffs to begin.

On Wednesday, the Senate named its seven members on the conference committee to negotiate a bridge over what Majority Leader Tommy Norment, R-James City, has described as a $600 million “chasm” between its budget proposal and the one adopted by the House of Delegates.

The firewall against Medicaid expansion has fallen in the Virginia House of Delegates.

The House Appropriations Committee on Sunday will consider a proposed two-year budget that includes extending Medicaid coverage to more than 300,000 uninsured Virginians under the Affordable Care Act and using the savings to pay for a blockbuster higher education initiative in Northern Virginia, a big infusion of cash into K-12 and early childhood programs, and a targeted expansion of raises for public employees.

February 11, 2017 1:20 PM EST - The 12th surge in Metro’s long-term maintenance overhaul known as SafeTrack runs Feb. 11-Feb.28 on the Blue Line. Take a look at how it will affect your commute. (Claritza Jimenez, Danielle Kunitz / The Washington Post)

RICHMOND, Va. — Dozens of people jeered Republicans on a House committee Friday after they declined to revive legislation aimed at changing the way political districts are drawn in Virginia.

More than 100 people gathered for the meeting of the House Privileges and Elections Committee. Some of them yelled “Cowards!” and “Shame on you!” after the panel refused a request by Democrats to reconsider five redistricting proposals that a subcommittee had killed earlier in the week.

Del. Mark Sickles (D-43) recognized the more than five decades of Koinonia consistently providing emergency relief services in the Franconia and Kingstowne Communities. The 43rd House District that Delegate Sickles represents includes most of the area served by Koinonia. Delegate Sickles presented a framed Commendation congratulating Koinonia. “The emergency relief that Koinonia provides our neighbors is more than just food and clothing. It’s a caring and compassionate contact with people showing them that they matter."

Clumps of students, from kindergarteners to eighth-graders, gradually emerged from the woods to fill up a scenic outdoor amphitheater that serves as the Burgundy Farm Country Day School’s assembly hall. They gathered on April 22 to celebrate Earth Day and the school’s 70th anniversary.

For decades, Northern Virginia has been among the leading regions to start, grow or relocate a business, not just in the United States, but also worldwide. Our region has a number of assets that make it unique. Our leaders at the local and state levels support a positive business climate, our public schools are among the best in the nation and our local colleges and universities support the development of a highly educated and skilled workforce.

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